Introduced bill calls for mandated hospice inspections

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Hospices would need to undergo an inspection every three years under a bill introduced by a New York congressman.

Rep. Tom Reed (R-NY) introduced the “Hospice Opportunities Supporting Patients with Integrity and Care Evaluations Act of 2014” on Aug. 1, with Rep. Mike Thompson (D-CA) as the co-sponsor. The bill states “any entity that is certified as a hospice program” would have a standard survey at least once every three years.

Additionally, $25 million would be transferred from the Federal Hospital Insurance Trust Fund for the time period of fiscal years 2014 through 2016 to fund the mandated hospice inspections.

If passed, the bill would amend Title XVIII of the Social Security Act and would be in effect six months after the date of enactment.

Skilled nursing facilities already are subject to required surveys in order to maintain Medicare and Medicaid certification under the Social Security Act.

Reed currently serves on the Committee On Ways and Means, Subcommittee on Human Resources, Subcommittee on Oversight and the Subcommittee on Select Revenue Measures.

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