Intra-arterial clot therapy does not lead to higher rate of independent living, researchers determine

Share this article:

Clot-busting devices administered through the artery do not improve victims' chances of living independently after a stroke, according to research published Thursday.

Researchers funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) undertook a controlled trial with 656 participants. Between 2006-2012, some of the participants received standard drug therapy of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Others received tPA as well as intra-arterial treatment, in which a catheter run through an artery administers tPA directly to large clots in the brain.

Both groups had a similar statistical likelihood of living independently within 90 days of stroke, the researchers found. Of those who received IV tPA alone, 39% were functionally independent within three months. Among the other group, that number was 41%.

The rate of victim disability was similar, even though intra-arterial treatment is 40% more effective than IV tPA at clot removal, the researchers found. However, intra-arterial therapy is also risky, with 16% of study participants experiencing complications.


Share this article:

More in News

Breier named new CEO at Kindred

Breier named new CEO at Kindred

Kindred Healthcare announced Thursday that it has chosen a new top executive to lead its push toward creating a mammoth national brand. Benjamin A. Breier, the company's current president and ...

Proposed managed care rule could accelerate shift away from nursing home care, official suggests

Proposed managed care rule could accelerate shift away ...

Proposed regulations slated for early 2015 likely will affect how Medicaid managed care balances home- versus facility-based long-term care, news sources reported Wednesday.

Assisted living residents say 'homelike' setting not so important

Contrary to conventional wisdom, assisted living residents might not place a high value on how "homelike" their surroundings are, suggest findings out of St. Catherine University in St. Paul, MN.