Institute of Medicine checklist offers guidelines for healthcare executives

Share this article:

Healthcare executives should have full understanding about the benefits of healthcare information technology as a means for improving outcomes and lowering costs, new guidelines recommend.

The Institute of Medicine, in collaboration with executives from 11 leading providers, developed a checklist offering strategies for cutting waste and improving patient care. In addition to outlining safeguards against medical errors, injuries and infections, the checklist emphasizes the use of IT to increase transparency on performance, outcomes and costs.

Executives from health systems including Geisinger, Kaiser Permanente, the Veterans Administration, the Cleveland Clinic and others contributed to the checklist.

“The prominent health executives behind the checklist, and others like them, are leading the way to superior care at reasonable costs,” IOM President Harvey Fineberg said in a statement.

Click here to read the full checklist.

Share this article:

More in News

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate arrested

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate ...

A double murder occurred late Tuesday night in a Houston nursing home room shared by four men, according to local authorities. Police arrested Guillermo Correa on suspicion of beating two ...

$2 million HIPAA settlement highlights mobile device risks facing healthcare providers

Laptops and other mobile devices containing personal health information have been stolen from long-term care ombudsman programs and other healthcare organizations, including from Concentra Health Services and QCA Health Plan Inc. Now, Concentra and QCA have agreed to legal settlements totaling nearly $2 million, federal ...

Long-term care nurses often 'scramble' to get family members' blessing for palliative ...

Nursing home residents might not transition to full palliative care until they are very near death, at which point nurses and family members act in a state of crisis, suggests recently published research out of Canada.