Improper pill splitting can be dangerous, study says

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The practice of splitting tablet forms of medications is a risky technique, Medical News Today reported.

Researchers found that nearly one-third of split tablet fragments varied from the recommended dosage by 15% or more, according to a study which was published in the January issue of the Journal of Advanced Nursing. Medical experts are concerned because with some medications, there is a narrow margin between therapeutic and toxic doses. They say the practice is widespread in all healthcare sectors.

"It is done for a number of reasons: to increase dose flexibility, to make tablets easier to swallow and to save money for both patients and healthcare providers,” the study's lead author, Dr. Charlotte Verrue, told Medical News Today. “However, the split tablets are often unequal sizes and a substantial amount of the tablet can be lost during splitting."
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