immigration reform

Providers likely to gain from immigration policy changes

Providers likely to gain from immigration policy changes

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President Obama will be unveiling a multi-pronged plan to overhaul the nation's immigration policy, possibly later today. Its most controversial component — a reprieve for the millions who face deportation — could also deliver a huge payoff to senior living operators.

Also in the news for June 11, 2014 . . .

Long-term care CEO joins McDonald's, Coke execs in immigration reform push ... CA nursing homes need stricter scrutiny from state agency, feds say ... Rite Aid under fire for Alzheimer's screening

Long-term care provider, worker groups weigh in on GOP immigration principles

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A statement of principles for immigration reform issued by Republicans in the House of Representatives is a good sign of potential legislative progress on this issue, long-term care provider and labor groups said Friday.

No way to fix staffing

No way to fix staffing

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It's no secret that our nation's long-term care facilities need additional caregivers. More than 43,000 direct care staff positions remain unfilled, according to figures from the American Health Care Association.

Strange ways to deal with long-term care's staffing challenge

Strange ways to deal with long-term care's staffing challenge

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It's no secret that our nation's long-term care facilities need additional caregivers. More than 43,000 direct care staff positions remain unfilled, according to figures from the American Health Care Association.

Valuing bilingual workers

Valuing bilingual workers

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We know that speaking two languages has positive effects, ranging from an ability to switch between tasks to cognitive quickness in older adults.

Uh-oh, Congress is about to 'fix' your hiring problems

Uh-oh, Congress is about to 'fix' your hiring problems

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Many providers are hoping immigration reform can help ease the field's chronic understaffing challenges. But like many problems the government sets out to solve, this one is likely to cause a few more.

The real labor problem

The real labor problem

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Long-term care operators are understandably giddy about the sudden prospect of immigration reform. Such a change holds the promise of a larger labor pool at a time of rampant worker shortages. Add in the possibility that a new labor law might also drive down wages and undermine union strength, and it's not hard to see why many operators are amped up.At press time, lawmakers in both Congressional chambers were getting ready to roll out legislation. Senators have reportedly agreed to a 13-year path to citizenship. Under their proposal, undocumented workers would get a green card after 10 years, and would need another three to gain citizenship. In the House, a three-pronged approach was being considered.

Immigration reform won't solve long-term care's fundamental staffing challenge

Immigration reform won't solve long-term care's fundamental staffing challenge

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Long-term care operators are understandably giddy about the sudden prospect of immigration reform. But they might want to curb their enthusiasm.

Proposed new visa could pave the way for more immigrant nursing home workers

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More immigrant workers could be employed in the nation's nursing homes in coming years under a deal reached Friday.

AHCA makes push for immigration reform

AHCA makes push for immigration reform

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Saying the current permanent visa programs for immigrants are "insufficient and inadequate" to meet long-term care staffing needs, the American Health Care Association outlined in March a vision for immigration reform.

Ryan budget begets testimony on immigrant workers in nursing homes

Ryan budget begets testimony on immigrant workers in nursing homes

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Thursday's Congressional hearing about immigration policy became a forum for discussing how the recently proposed budget from Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) would affect long-term care providers.

AHCA calls for immigration reform to meet staffing shortage

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Saying the current permanent visa programs for immigrants are "insufficient and inadequate" to meet long-term care staffing needs, the American Health Care Association outlined its vision of immigration reform Wednesday.