Illinois union, nursing homes reach tentative agreement

Share this article:

Nursing home operators and the union representing more than 7,000 nursing assistants came to a tentative agreement last week after more than five months of contract negotiations.

The Illinois Association of Health Care Facilities (IAHCF), which represents the owners of 115 Illinois nursing homes serving some 18,000 residents in Illinois, and Local 4 of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), said the tentative agreement would provide workers with an immediate wage increase of 30 cents an hour, effective May 1, plus an additional 40 cents an hour increase effective on an employee's anniversary date in 2005.

Also, the tentative agreement would give workers hourly increases of 45 cents and 40 cents on their anniversary dates in 2006 and 2007, respectively. Workers with 15 or more years of service would get an additional wage premium. The union was asking for increases of nearly $2 per hour for assistants currently making an average of about $9 per hour, or about $18,000 annually.

The proposed deal also would provide some pharmaceutical assistance for the first time but cut back on employer contributions to health coverage in some areas.

The members of the IAHCF are set to vote on the tentative agreement. The union's ratification voted is expected by the end of this week.

Share this article:

More in News

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in two years: Avalere

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in ...

More than three-quarters of Medicaid beneficiaries will be enrolled in a managed care plan as of 2016, according to an Avalere Health analysis released Thursday. The numbers reveal that managed ...

Nursing home asked for employee's personal information too often, jury rules

The human resources department of a Maine nursing home did not properly protect a former employee's personal identification information, a jury recently ruled.

Test could confirm sepsis within an hour

Nursing home residents might benefit from a new way of diagnosing and treating sepsis made possible by discoveries out of the University of British Columbia.