I couldn't live without...The Compliance Store

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Barbara Baxter
Barbara Baxter
Prior to subscribing to The Compliance Store's comprehensive database of regulatory documents and manuals, Barbara Baxter, an administrator, used to rely on periodicals and communications with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services for regulatory guidelines.

But Baxter's approach at her Woodstock, GA-based facility became a lot simpler when she switched to The Compliance Store's web-based service.

When shopping around for a new regulatory solution, her primary concern was accuracy, followed by cost, and something user-friendly.

“I have saved a great deal of time using this program,” Baxter says. “My staff have also been impressed that we know of changes before our peers.

“This is a great benefit to our quality improvement program, too. It gives us valuable information to get a head start on changes coming to us from CMS.”

Web-based source
The Compliance Store provides subscription-based access to more than 7,000 regulatory documents, which are continually updated. The website also has state regulations posted for each of the 50 states.

For more info: (877) LTC-REGS; www.thecompliancestore.com

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