I couldn't live without...MDI Achieve's Matrix eMar

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I couldn't live without...MDI Achieve's Matrix eMar
I couldn't live without...MDI Achieve's Matrix eMar
The prospect of changing from a completely paper-based facility to a “wired” one might seem daunting, but for employees of Parkview Haven in Francesville, IN, the transition has been worth it.

Joshua Johnson, chief technology officer at the continuing care retirement community, says that the facility used a paper-based system for most operations, except for MDS. But Parkview recently adopted MDI Achieve's Matrix eMAR system for med passes.

He said he likes Matrix because it's user-friendly for all staff, and even consultants can learn how to use it quickly.
Most importantly, consulting physicians and nurses say they are comfortable using it.

“Our nurses enter one order and Matrix checks it for allergies or interactions, sends it to the pharmacy, and populates it to the eMAR for med pass,” Johnson explained.

Medication documentation software
MDI Achieve's Matrix eMAR electronically documents and tracks medications and treatments as they are administered.

For more information:
(866) 469-3766
www.mdiachieve.com

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