I couldn't live without...IVANS

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Neetra Barclay
Neetra Barclay
With the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services looking extra closely at Medicare and Medicaid claims these days, skilled nursing providers need every tool available to file efficiently and accurately.

Nobody knows that better than Neetra Barclay, the director of finance for Glastonbury Health Care Center, a long-term care facility in Glastonbury, CT.

To process Medicare and Medicaid claims at her facility, Barclay uses the LIME Health Information Exchange portal, which is provided by the Stamford, CT-based company IVANS.

As with all software solutions, being user-friendly is crucial.

“I appreciate the ability to key claims instantly and how I can watch my claims during processing,” Barclay says. “Also, I'm able to manage and maintain the claims' integrity if there are clerical issues. I've found that the customer service, when I've needed it, is very responsive and helpful.”

Health information exchange
IVANS health information portal offers providers a single user-interface to access multiple payers and applications for processing claims and tracking payment.

For more info: (800) 548-2690 or www.ivans.com

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