I couldn't live without...Ergolet Luna overhead lift

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Mike Harmer
Mike Harmer
Mike Harmer, the director of environmental services at the Ohio Eastern Star Nursing Home in Mt.

Vernon, OH, recently turned to Ergolet when his overhead lift supplier went out of business.

His 100-bed skilled nursing facility uses overhead lifts upwards of 20 to 30 times a day, so choosing one that was easy to use and easy to transport from room to room was crucial. Harmer said that having lifts with an emergency stop and an emergency release is a must in his facility. Ergolet's Luna lift has both, as well as a weight-lifting capacity of 600 pounds.

For Harmer, the best part of the Luna system is the trolley, which is a cart that the lift can be placed on for transport.

“You have to pay extra for the trolley, but it's well worth it,” he said. “Before the trolley, we were carrying the motors for the lift from room to room,” which can accelerate wear and tear, he noted.

Resident transfer system
Ergolet's Luna overhead lift and trolley system allows users to safely move the lifting device — as well as slings, chargers and other accessories — from room to room.

For more info:  (888) 374-6741; www.ergolet.com

Is there something you couldn't live without? Write Mary Gustafson at mary.gustafson@mcknights.com.

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