I couldn't live without...Curaspan transition software

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I couldn't live without...Curaspan transition software
I couldn't live without...Curaspan transition software
Prior to adopting Curaspan's software, nurses routinely spent over two hours reviewing a patient's chart when they were being discharged from the hospital and transitioning to a nursing home, according to Patricia Buiocchi, of Northeast Rehabilitation in Salem, NH.

“The efficiencies are HUGE for us. We used to have a nurse liaison review every patient in the hospital and fill out our own screen for these patients for our hospital clinicians to read prior to admission,” Buiocchi says. “Now we can just print off the Curaspan screen and use that as our template for our employees to review and read prior to admission.”

The software has led to “at least a 20% increase in referrals and or productivity of our employees, which is a huge savings of time and productivity,” she says.

Buiocchi adds that customer service professionals are only a phone call away.

Transition software

Curaspan software helps providers deal more efficiently with resident transfers.
For more info: (800) 446-9614 or http://connect.curaspan.com

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