I couldn't live without... Touchtown Resident Apps

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Jill Vitale-Aussem
Jill Vitale-Aussem

For senior residents at Christian Living Communities' Clermont Park continuing care retirement community, a new app on a tablet will provide more freedom.

Residents used to have to put out a ring on their doors at night and in the morning to let staff know they were in their rooms, explains executive director Jill Vitale-Aussem. Now with  Touchtown Resident Apps, they can check in and out via their tablet.

Touchtown has traditionally offered communications options such as in-house TV channels and digital signs.

With the ability to check in and out via their resident app system, Clermont residents “can sleep in or stay out, and not have people in their business,” she says. 

Eight residents are doing testing now, and 165 tablets will be available by February. “Residents are really excited,” Vitale-Aussem says. “It's all about being resident-directed.”

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Resident apps

Touchtown Resident Apps include the ability to send messages, information about activities and menus, daily check-in, a staff and resident directory, and displays of transportation schedules. 

For more information:

(866) 868-2486

www.touchtown.us 




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