I couldn't live without ... Cerner CareTracker

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Jeanne Gerstenkorn, RN, BSN, MSN
Jeanne Gerstenkorn, RN, BSN, MSN

Cerner's CareTracker has allowed Presbyterian Manors of Mid-America facilities to provide better resident-centered care, according to director of clinical information Jeanne Gerstenkorn, RN, BSN, MSN.

CareTracker's visual icons are designed to make documentation easier, and to provide data to develop a care plan. For example, “you may be able to develop a restorative toileting to reduce incontinence,” Gerstenkorn says, by using CareTracker to document and evaluate specific incidences of incontinence in a resident.

“You can clearly identify patterns,” she says. CareTracker is designed to improve quality standards, with alerts for residents who are not eating or drinking, who are having constipation, losing weight or showing declines in their Activities of Daily Living. 

“It's been a good program for us,” Gerstenkorn says. “It's very easy to customize.”

Cerner CareTracker

CareTracker captures resident care activities to help organizations monitor and improve resident health. Users can identify patterns, improve quality, as well as maximize reimbursement.

For more information: 

(800) 338 -3681 

www.cerner.com

Is there something you couldn't live without? 

Email Elizabeth Newman at elizabeth.newman@mcknights.com




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