House subcommittee expected to repeal the Affordable Care Act's Medicare payment board

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Skilled nursing providers and inpatient rehab facilities offer clashing views on Medicare payments
Skilled nursing providers and inpatient rehab facilities offer clashing views on Medicare payments

The House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Health is expected to vote Wednesday on legislation repealing the Affordable Care Act's controversial Medicare payment board.

The independent payment advisory board (IPAB), the repeal of which is supported by Democrats and Republicans in Congress, was created to control Medicare spending. The panel's recommendations would be contingent on approval by Congress.

Polls have showed, however, that the majority of Americans support IPAB. But providers have said they fear losing lobbying power over Medicare cuts. In a letter to members of the House committee, the American Medical Association said IPAB has far too little accountability to be charged with making major payment changes. Additionally, the association says the panel would compound problems caused by the physician pay formula.

“Instead of relying on another formula that imposes across-the-board cuts that we know do not work, members of Congress should be taking steps to strengthen Medicare for patients, physicians and taxpayers,” AMA President Peter W. Carmel, M.D. said in a statement.

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