House and Senate introduce resolutions for Alzheimer's treatment

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A bipartisan group of Congressional lawmakers introduced a resolution Tuesday in support of the Obama administration's goal of finding a treatment for Alzheimer's by 2025.

Representatives Edward J. Markey (D-MA), Chris Smith (R-NJ) and Michael Burgess (R-TX) introduced the resolution in the House, while Sens. Mark Warner (D-VA) and Susan Collins (R-ME) did so in the Senate. The resolution affirms the goals proposed by the Department of Health and Human Services and in the National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease.

“The deadline of preventing and treating this devastating disease by 2025 will keep us on track and unify the work of scientists, doctors, caregivers and advocates,” Rep. Markey said in a statement.

Experts estimate that there are 4.5 million Americans with Alzheimer's and project that 15 million will be diagnosed in coming decades, including up to 10 million baby boomers. The projected cost of care to Medicare and Medicaid for Alzheimer's is $850 billion each year by 2050.

Click here to read the House resolution.

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