Hip fractures linked to higher short-term mortality rates in women, research shows

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Hip fractures in women ages 65 to 79 are linked to in an increase in short-term mortality a new study finds.

As part of a larger, ongoing study, Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research investigators followed 1,116 women who had hip fractures and compared them with about 4,500 similar women without hip fractures. They found that the risk of dying within a year of breaking a hip doubled for women in their 70s. Mortality for women in their 80s remained the same, regardless of whether they had a hip fracture. But, the risk of short-term mortality tripled for otherwise healthy women who suffered a hip fracture in their 80s, according to the study.

"If our findings are replicated, they would suggest that research should focus on hip fracture prevention and interventions in these groups that could decrease mortality during that high-risk period," the authors wrote. "Women who are 65 to 70 years of age continue to have an increased risk of mortality for up to five to 10 years; therefore, prevention of hip fractures in these women should be of high priority."

The study was published online in the Archives of Internal Medicine, on Sept. 26.
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