Hidden cameras result in criminal charges against Ohio nursing home owner, including substandard care and forgery

Share this article:

Hidden cameras placed inside an Ohio nursing home have led to 39 criminal charges, state officials have announced.

Relatives of residents began complaining to authorities about Autumn Health Care in Zanesville in December 2012, according to Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine's office. The relatives allowed hidden cameras to be placed in certain rooms, and these allegedly captured footage of staff providing poor care and falsifying documentation.

The press release from the AG's office did not provide details about the alleged wrongdoings, and DeWine declined to go into specifics during a press conference Thursday, according to local reports.

Autumn Health Care owner Steven L. Hitchens, 58, faces charges of corruption, Medicaid fraud and forgery. The corrupt activity charge carries a mandatory 10-year prison sentence, the Zanesville Times-Recorder reported. An additional 16 charges have been brought against the facility as a whole. No staff members have been charged.

An Autumn spokesperson said the company had no comment as of press time.

Share this article:

More in News

Expert says providers often wrongly threatened by PEPPER reports

Instead of fearing further scrutiny by federal authorities, providers should embrace the opportunity to get feedback in the form of PEPPER reports, legal experts said Monday at the LeadingAge annual meeting in Nashville.

Healthcare reform already driving diverse, dynamic long-term care models, LeadingAge leaders say

Healthcare reform already driving diverse, dynamic long-term care ...

One way to gauge the effects is healthcare reform is by looking at ongoing changes to the continuing care retirement community model, LeadingAge officials said Monday at the association's annual ...

Federal court: Nursing home can be sued for firing hairdresser who can ...

Is the ability to transport residents in their wheelchairs an essential function of a nursing home hairdresser? A federal appeals court says it's a valid question and is allowing a hairdresser to sue a facility that fired her.