HHS program to pay healthcare professionals who e-prescribe

Share this article:
The Department of Health and Human Services has announced a new incentive program to help spur the advancement of electronic prescribing practices.

Starting in 2009 and 2010, physicians and other "eligible professionals" will receive a 2% incentive payment for successful use of e-prescriptions. In 2011, that incentive will drop to 1%, then to 0.5% in 2013. Eligible professionals who have not implemented a successful e-prescribing system by 2012 will incur a payment reduction, according to HHS. Some facilities can be exempted from the penalty if it is determined they will be adversely affected by the system.

E-prescribing could help reduce medication errors and adverse drug reactions among Medicare beneficiaries, according to HHS. Recent estimates place the number of adverse drug reaction at roughly 530,000 per year. Many of these lead to hospitalizations or admissions to nursing homes. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has said it spends up to $900 million per year treating adverse drug reactions (McKnight's, 5/27) and any money saved through e-prescribing can be put towards other beneficiary services.
Share this article:

More in News

A small team of workers responds best in emergencies, expert says

A small team of workers responds best in ...

Long-term care providers should consider a "flat" crisis management approach that relies on a core group of staff members, experts advised Wednesday at the LeadingAge annual conference.

Nursing homes have better pain and catheter management if leaders have more ...

Nursing homes led by administrators and directors of nursing with higher levels of education and certification have better outcomes on some key quality measures, according to recently published findings.

Court green-lights charges that a healthcare network underused observation stays

A whistleblower can continue to pursue charges that a Nevada healthcare network routinely admitted people as hospital inpatients when they should have been placed in observation status, a federal appeals court recently ruled.