HHS: New electronic claims regulation could save providers time, money

Share this article:
CMS Administrator and Secretary of the Medicare Trustees Marilyn Tavenner
CMS Administrator and Secretary of the Medicare Trustees Marilyn Tavenner
The Department of Health and Human Services announced new standards Thursday that it said would streamline the electronic health claims process and save providers and government health plans $4.5 billion in administrative costs.

The regulation, known as the Adoption of Standards for Health Care Electronic Funds Transfers and Remittance Advice, simplifies the format and data content of the transmission a health plan sends to its bank when it's paying a claim to a provider electronically (through an electronic funds transfer) and to issue a Remittance Advice notice. 

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services CMS Acting Administrator Marilyn Tavenner said the rule ensures that healthcare providers will spend much less time on paperwork.

The regulation took effect Sunday. All health plans covered under HIPAA must comply by January 1, 2014. Click here to view the interim final regulation with comment period.

Share this article:

More in News

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate arrested

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate ...

A double murder occurred late Tuesday night in a Houston nursing home room shared by four men, according to local authorities. Police arrested Guillermo Correa on suspicion of beating two ...

$2 million HIPAA settlement highlights mobile device risks facing healthcare providers

Laptops and other mobile devices containing personal health information have been stolen from long-term care ombudsman programs and other healthcare organizations, including from Concentra Health Services and QCA Health Plan Inc. Now, Concentra and QCA have agreed to legal settlements totaling nearly $2 million, federal ...

Long-term care nurses often 'scramble' to get family members' blessing for palliative ...

Nursing home residents might not transition to full palliative care until they are very near death, at which point nurses and family members act in a state of crisis, suggests recently published research out of Canada.