Health info expert: Time for long-term care providers to raise their hands for inclusion

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Long-term care providers must collaborate and create partnerships with their acute care counterparts in order to make efficient use of new technology, a health information management expert told listeners at a special McKnight's webcast Tuesday.

“We also have to recognize that investments are going to be needed to innovate and develop business models that will enable effective care that is also efficient,” said Deborah Green, the vice president of HIM solutions at the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA). The group provides training and thought leadership on health IT topics. Green was the featured speaker at the August McKnight's Super Tuesday webcast, a part of the continuing series stemming from the McKnight's Online Expo.

While long-term and post-acute care providers aren't eligible for federal meaningful use incentives for electronic health records, they are critical care partners, she said.  In the short term, long-term care providers have to strengthen relationships and then become a part of accountable care organizations and other bundled payment initiatives.

“It's important that you raise your hand with accountable care organizations and you raise your hand with your admission sources so that you can engage in what information they need, and information you need,” Green said.

The next McKnight's Super Tuesday webcast will be on MDS 3.0 at 1 p.m. ET on Tuesday, September 11. Registration is free and participants can receive an hour of CE credit.  An archived version of this week's Super Tuesday event can be found by clicking here.

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