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Health Affairs

How old is too old to work?

How old is too old to work?

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A recent article in Health Affairs centered on nurses delaying retirement and claimed this is boosting the workforce. Should we believe this?

More registered nurses are delaying retirement, researchers say

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Despite "imminent retirement" of baby boomers, more registered nurses are working longer after age 50, researchers find.

Nursing homes send too many dementia residents to the hospital in their last year of life, study finds

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Nursing homes could do a better job of keeping residents with dementia out of the hospital during their last year of life, suggests recently published findings in Health Affairs.

Spacely Sprockets and the future of medical care

Spacely Sprockets and the future of medical care

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So does anyone remember the cartoon "The Jetsons"? You know, George and Jane, daughter Judy, son Elroy and, of course, the dog, Astro. It's kind of fun to see how their 1960s and 1980s syndicated views of the futureare turning out. (I love Nick at Nite).

Forget Paris, give me the crossword: What makes residents happy?

Forget Paris, give me the crossword: What makes residents happy?

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Which would make you happier: walking onto your porch on a sunny morning or taking snapshots from the top of the Eiffel Tower? How about: having a long, fun conversation with your child or going to a Bob Dylan concert?

Telemedicine reduces nursing homes' hospital readmissions if staff engagement is high, researchers find

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Skilled nursing facilities that implement a telemedicine service and teach staff to use it could reduce their hospital readmissions, but current payment systems do not encourage this, according to a forthcoming study in Health Affairs.

When it comes to free Medicaid dollars, some governors in a state of denial

When it comes to free Medicaid dollars, some governors in a state of denial

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Under a newly expanded Medicaid program option, states stand to reap billions of dollars in what amounts to free money. Much of this could go toward better resident care. But some governors can't help themselves and are acting stupid.

Case for bundled pay made

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Large-scale bundling of government reimbursements is needed, say researchers who have studied the topic. Post-acute care was the fastest growing major healthcare spending category for government programs between 1994-2009, according to Harvard University researcher Amitabh Chandra, Ph.D., and co-authors.

Majority of hospices exclude some patients due to Medicare daily fee, researchers discover

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Despite the fact that hospice is one of the fastest growing parts of Medicare, 78% of surveyed hospice operators turned away patients with the potential for high-costing care, according to a new study published Monday in the journal Health Affairs.

Study shows long nursing shifts lead to dropouts, unhappy patients

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Nurses who work long shifts are more likely to leave the profession, and also have dissatisfied patients, a new study finds.

New Medicare payment reforms might not keep costs from rising, study says

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Between 2001 and 2010, spending on Medicare beneficiaries needing post-acute services has jumped from $26.6 billion to $58 billion.

Accessibility is key to success of ACOs, report says

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Those most likely to benefit from participation in accountable care organizations may face the biggest barriers to enrollment, a new report suggests.

'Overzealous' investigators undermining anti-fraud efforts, report finds

'Overzealous' investigators undermining anti-fraud efforts, report finds

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The government often hires "overzealous" investigators to detect fraudulent Medicare and Medicaid billing practices, a new report alleges. These examiners often target technical errors instead of unscrupulous practices, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's brief asserts.

Affordable Care Act laws targeting elderly could harmful consequences, study suggests

Affordable Care Act laws targeting elderly could harmful consequences, study suggests

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Three Affordable Care Act initiatives often touted as coordinating care and improving outcomes for elderly adults could actually make their circumstances worse, a new study suggests.

CMS defends 'passive enrollment' into dual eligible demonstration programs

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Government officials say safeguards are in place to prevent dually eligible Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries from losing access to care when they enroll in demonstration projects.

Hospitals increasingly use 'observation stay' loophole, data shows

Hospitals increasingly use 'observation stay' loophole, data shows

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Physicians and hospitals increasingly are admitting more Medicare beneficiaries for observation stays rather than as hospital inpatients, new research concludes.

Minorities are entering nursing homes in record numbers, new study finds

Minorities have entered nursing facilities in record numbers during the past decade, while wealthier white residents have been leaving skilled nursing care, new research shows.

Study: Nursing home nurses top job-dissatisfaction list

Study: Nursing home nurses top job-dissatisfaction list

Even as demand is growing for nurses in all segments of healthcare, 27% of nursing home nurses and 24% of hospital nurses reported being dissatisfied with their jobs, a newly released study found. Just 13% of nurses in other healthcare environments reported such feelings of dissatisfaction.

Long-term care in the spotlight

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It's only the first week in January, but 2010 already has served up some exciting developments for the long-term care field.

Health Affairs journal devotes January issue to long-term care

Health Affairs journal devotes January issue to long-term care

The health policy journal Health Affairs is releasing an issue today on long-term care and related services, and the challenges confronting caregiving.

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