Gov. Bush may seek to reverse feeding-tube law rejection by court

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It was still unclear as to when the feeding tube would be removed from a severely brain-damaged Florida woman whose case has made medical ethical headlines for years. The Florida Supreme Court last week ruled that Gov. Jeb Bush and lawmakers violated the state's constitution with the passage of a law that invoked an order to reinsert a feeding tube into the woman, Theresa Schiavo.

Last fall, Florida's legislature passed "Terri's Law" and ordered that the 40-year-old woman be hooked up again to the feeding tube after its removal six days earlier had been allowed by a lower court.

Following this recent court ruling, Bush's attorneys said they were exploring options such as requesting a rehearing or appealing to the Supreme Court of the United States. Bush gets 10 days following the court's decision to seek a rehearing. During this time Schiavo, must continue receiving nourishment.

Depending on what Bush lawyers do, Schiavo's fate could be clouded indefinitely, said George Felos, the chief lawyer for Schiavo's husband, Michael, who has advocated unhooking her from life support systems. Theresa Schiavo's parents have fought to keep life support in place to keep her alive.

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