Georgia nursing home to pay $2.5 million settlement

Share this article:

A Georgia nursing home has agreed to pay $2.5 million to resolve allegations of misuse of government funds.

Federal and state authorities investigated Life Care Center of Lawrenceville, GA, after five whistle-blowers filed a complaint against the facility in 2002. They alleged the facility failed to provide adequate care to residents and, as a result, some residents died prematurely. The failure was a result of under-staffing, inadequate training, high staff turnover, an ineffective medical director and other deficiencies at the facility, they said. All five complainants were relatives of residents at Lawrenceville.

The fine was assessed based on violations of the federal False Claims Act for billing for services that were not provided or were worthless to residents. Tennessee-based Life Care Centers of America, Gwinnett Operations LLC, Developers Investment Company Inc. and Forrest L. Preston will pay the fine. The federal government, the state of Georgia and some of the initial complainants will receive portions of the settlment.
Share this article:

More in News

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate arrested

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate ...

A double murder occurred late Tuesday night in a Houston nursing home room shared by four men, according to local authorities. Police arrested Guillermo Correa on suspicion of beating two ...

$2 million HIPAA settlement highlights mobile device risks facing healthcare providers

Laptops and other mobile devices containing personal health information have been stolen from long-term care ombudsman programs and other healthcare organizations, including from Concentra Health Services and QCA Health Plan Inc. Now, Concentra and QCA have agreed to legal settlements totaling nearly $2 million, federal ...

Long-term care nurses often 'scramble' to get family members' blessing for palliative ...

Nursing home residents might not transition to full palliative care until they are very near death, at which point nurses and family members act in a state of crisis, suggests recently published research out of Canada.