Genesis nursing home illegally reneged on job offer to deaf applicant, government charges

Share this article:

Managers at a New Jersey nursing home owned by Genesis HealthCare withdrew a job offer to a qualified applicant because he is deaf, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is charging in a lawsuit announced Wednesday.

Stefan P. Denisiuk initially was hired to work two part-time positions in food service at the Holly Manor Center in Mendham, NJ, according to the EEOC. However, after managers offered him the positions, he met with a second group of managers, who “grilled” him about his communication abilities, the charges state. The facility subsequently withdrew the job offer.

At the time, Holly Manor said it rescinded the offer to pursue more experienced applicants, according to the EEOC. The agency argues that the real reason had to do with Denisiuk being deaf.

“Here, Mr. Denisiuk was qualified, experienced and ready to work, only to have Holly Manor pull back its job offer because of his disability,” stated Robert D. Rose, acting regional attorney for the EEOC's New York District Office. “This violates federal law. ”

The company operating Holly Manor Center, 84 Cold Hill Road Operations, also is named in the suit. The EEOC said it wants to ensure that Holly Manor cannot discriminate against disabled applicants in the future, and that it is seeking damages for Denisiuk.

Genesis had not responded to a request for comment as of press time.

Share this article:

More in News

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in two years: Avalere

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in ...

More than three-quarters of Medicaid beneficiaries will be enrolled in a managed care plan as of 2016, according to an Avalere Health analysis released Thursday. The numbers reveal that managed ...

Nursing home asked for employee's personal information too often, jury rules

The human resources department of a Maine nursing home did not properly protect a former employee's personal identification information, a jury recently ruled.

Test could confirm sepsis within an hour

Nursing home residents might benefit from a new way of diagnosing and treating sepsis made possible by discoveries out of the University of British Columbia.