Flu shots don't hurt turnover, study says

Share this article:

Requiring flu shots is not a primary reason for employees quitting, an analysis finds.

While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends all healthcare employees receive the annual flu vaccine, facilities vary on whether to make it mandatory.

To see the effects of a vaccine requirement, Loyola University Medical Center in 2009 began an analysis after making flu shots required for employees, students, volunteers and contractors. 

In year one, 99.2% of employees received the vaccine, with 0.7% being exempt for religious or medical reasons, and 0.1% choosing to leave rather than get the shot. By 2012, while the rate of exemptions rose to 1.2%, only 0.6% refused vaccination and left. Plus, of the five people who refused to be vaccinated, three were unpaid volunteers and two were part-time staff, explained Jorge Parada, M.D., M.P.H., the study's author and professor of medicine at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

Fewer than 15 people out of 8,000 chose termination over vaccination, he said. Results were presented at the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology Conference in June. 


Share this article:

More in News

$1.3 million settlement marks second recent deal over SNF supervision of therapy providers

$1.3 million settlement marks second recent deal over ...

A Maryland nursing home company has agreed to a $1.3 million settlement over charges that it did not prevent overbilling by its contracted therapy provider, federal authorities announced Monday. This ...

MedPAC chairman: Three-day stay requirement is 'archaic'

The government should pay for skilled nursing care without a preliminary three-day hospital stay, and the recovery auditor program should be reformed, Medicare Payment Advisory Commission members said at a meeting Friday.

Nursing homes can't carve out billing, collections in arbitration agreements, AR Supreme ...

A nursing home arbitration agreement largely reserved the provider's rights to sue residents while limiting residents' legal options, causing it to fail a "mutual obligation" requirement, the Arkansas Supreme Court recently ruled .