Five factors influence nurse turnover, report suggests

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Up to 5% of a facility's budget can go toward costs associated with nurse turnover. But there are five factors researchers have identified that could contribute to a reduction in turnover and increase both job satisfaction and, by extension, patient care.

Researchers at New York University's College of Nursing surveyed 1,933 newly licensed nurses, asking what influences their decisions to stay at a job or leave for a new position. The top five deciding factors, according to the survey results, are satisfaction, organizational commitment, autonomy, opportunities for promotion, and fewer outside job opportunities. By keeping these factors in mind, report authors suggest facilities can reduce the rate of nurse turnover. This would save the facility money and limit disruptions to patient care.

Other positive factors many newly licensed nurses said would increase their likelihood of remaining at a job include variety, support from supervisors and making sure facility rules apply equally to all employees. High workload, organizational constraints and mandatory overtime were all cited as factors likely to result in turnover. The NYU study appears in a recent issue of Nursing Economics, and is discussed at length in the June issue of Oncology Nursing News.
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