Facilities' bankruptcy filing marks latest twist in Connecticut nursing home strike

Share this article:

The five Connecticut nursing homes involved in a high-profile workers strike filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Monday, citing monthly losses from contracts with union workers.

After an eight-month strike and legal actions that reached the U.S. Supreme Court, about 600 workers at the five nursing homes operated by HealthBridge Management are scheduled to return to work on March 1. They will work under the terms and conditions of their preexisting contract while a new contract is hammered out. They had gone on strike after negotiations over a new contract broke down.

The bankruptcy filing comes less than a week after the employees' union — New England Health Care Employees Union, District 1199, SEIU — trumpeted the return to the work as a triumph. The filing pertains only to the five facilities in question, not to HealthBridge Management as a whole. With the workers back on the job, the facilities will begin losing about $1.3 million each month due mainly to provisions of the workers' collective bargaining agreement, HealthBridge says. Total per-day benefit costs for the five nursing homes are 24% higher than at other unionized Connecticut facilities, the company says.

The HealthBridge facilities are seeking court approval to continue routine operations, including paying vendors and employees, while reorganizing under bankruptcy protection.

The Chapter 11 filing is a “cynical evasion of responsibility,” said David Pickus, president of the workers' union. HealthBridge slammed the union's statement proposing the facilities go into receivership rather than bankruptcy, saying the union is trying to "skirt any blame" for the facilities' fiscal difficulties.
Share this article:

More in News

Congressman requests briefing on nursing home five-star rating system

Congressman requests briefing on nursing home five-star rating ...

A leader in Congress has called for an evaluation of the nursing home five-star rating system in light of a recent New York Times article. Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) requested ...

CMS: Discharge assessments must be completed when residents transfer to a non-certified ...

Skilled nursing facilities must complete a discharge assessment when a resident is transferred from a certified to a non-certified bed, even if both beds are in the same building, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services emphasizes in a recent memorandum.

Focusing on a single word might improve nursing home residents' quality of ...

An affordable, easily implemented relaxation technique could improve nursing home residents' psychological well-being. It also could potentially boost their immune systems, according to recently published findings.