Enrollment increases at nursing schools, but programs turn away nearly 40,000 applications

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Enrollment in entry-level baccalaureate nursing programs grew from 2008 to 2009, but many qualified applications also were turned away from programs this year, according to preliminary data from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

“Despite considerable financial challenges and capacity constraints, nursing schools nationwide were successful in their efforts to maintain a robust pipeline of future nurses this year,” AACN President Fay Raines said in a statement.

Enrollment in entry-level baccalaureate nursing programs increased by 3.5% from 2008 to 2009. But nearly 40,000 qualified applications were turned away from 550 entry-level baccalaureate nursing programs in 2009. Nursing schools with master's programs reported a 9.6% increase in enrollment. Overall enrollment is up by 20.5% in doctoral nursing programs.


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