Employers' healthcare costs rise 6.1% in 2005

Share this article:

Healthcare costs for U.S. employers increased by 6.1% this year. That compares to a rise of 15% at the beginning of the decade, according to a new survey.

The lower costs are due, in part, to companies' shifting costs to workers via higher deductibles and other strategies -- and changing vendors, according to the National Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Plans 2005.

Businesses spent an average of $7,089 per worker to provide health coverage in 2005, according to a survey by Mercer Health & Benefits LLC. Costs could increase 6.7% in 2006, Mercer said.

The report can be ordered for $500 at http://www.mercerhr.com/ushealthplansurvey. It will become available in March 2006.

Share this article:

More in News

Long-term care continues to lead in deal volume and value: PwC report

Long-term care continues to lead in deal volume ...

Long-term care bucked healthcare industry trends with strong merger and acquisition activity in the second quarter of 2014, according to newly released data from professional services firm PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Empowering nurse practitioners could reduce hospitalizations from SNFs, study finds

Granting more authority to nurse practitioners is associated with reduced hospitalization of skilled nursing facility residents, according to recently published findings.

Pioneer ACO drops out of program, despite reductions in skilled nursing utilization

A California healthcare system has become the latest dropout from the Pioneer Accountable Care Organization program, despite reducing skilled nursing facility utilization and improving its readmission rates. Sharp HealthCare announced its decision in a quarterly financial statement released Tuesday.