Doctors, nurses clash over plan to expand role of nurse practitioners

Share this article:

More than half of all U.S. states are mulling the possibility of expanding the professional role of nurse practitioners as a primary care physician shortage looms, according to recent news reports.

As many as 28 states are considering increasing the authority given to nurse practitioners, The Associated Press reported. The recently implemented healthcare reform law will add 32 million insured Americans to an already short-handed healthcare system. Many states believe that by expanding nurse practitioner roles to allow nurses to practice without a physician's oversight, or to prescribe medication, they can save money and still provide care services.

The Medicare program reimburses nurse practitioners at 85% of what physicians are paid, the AP reported. Many nurses, especially in long-term care, have said that allowing nurses to prescribe medications would eliminate delays in nursing home residents receiving needed pain medication. Physicians are generally opposed to the plan, and the American Medical Association has dispatched a number of doctors to state legislatures across the country to argue against the bigger role for nurses.
Share this article:

More in News

Nursing home administrators do not believe that pay-for-performance improves care quality or facility profitability, survey shows

Nursing home administrators do not believe that pay-for-performance ...

Most nursing home administrators do not believe that pay-for-performance initiatives lead to improved resident care or stronger bottom lines, according to findings recently published in the Journal of Aging and ...

Former CNA gets 16-year prison sentence for stealing nursing home residents' identities

Three former nursing home aides are facing prison time for stealing residents' identities and conning the government, state and federal authorities announced Thursday.

Aggression strongly signals pain only when dementia reaches advanced stages, researchers find

For a person with dementia, the link between aggressive behavior and physical pain is strong only in the condition's advanced stages, University of Florida researchers have found.