Doctor with ties to nursing home controversy a victim in car bombing

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Dr. Trent P. Pierce, a former nursing home medical director involved in legal controversy, was the victim of a car bombing at his West Memphis, AR, home late last week. The 54-year-old chairman of the state medical board, remained in critical condition as of press time. Authorities said they had no suspects in the attack but said they were examining lawsuits the physician was involved in.

Officials said they were investigating what was believed to be a homemade bomb left in the driveway by Pierce's car. He suffered severe burns, shrapnel injuries and a badly injured eye in an attack last Wednesday, according to local reports.

Up until a few weeks ago, Pierce was a co-defendant along with Golden Living (formerly Beverly Enterprises) in a wrongful death suit that reached the Arkansas Supreme Court. He was recently released from that case, however, but has been in involved in other controversy through the years. He was first named to the state medical board 12 years ago. He was a facility medical director for the former Beverly Enterprises until 2004, when the facility was sold. He currently has no ties to the company, said spokesman Blair Jackson.

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