Discovery could lead to faster, fuller healing of diabetic wounds, researcher says

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Injecting a plasma protein called plasminogen around chronic diabetic wounds can lead to complete healing, according to new research from Umea University in Sweden.

Doctoral student Yue Shen undertook the plasminogen study for his thesis. Plasminogen stimulates inflammation that promotes wound healing, and the substance was lacking in chronic wounds in diabetic mice, Shen discovered. By injecting plasminogen at the wound site, he was able to trigger the inflammatory response and significantly increase the rate of healing.

“The findings in Yue Shen's thesis not only reshape our molecular understanding of the role of plasminogen during wound healing process, but also bring hope to millions of desperate patients who suffer from chronic wounds,” according to a Umea University statement.

A clinical study to use human plasminogen to treat people's chronic wounds is now in the works.

Click here to access the complete findings.

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