Direct Care Worker

Racial, gender disparities among direct care workers hurting recruitment, researchers say

Racial, gender disparities among direct care workers hurting recruitment, researchers say

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Women of color working in direct care roles at nursing homes are more likely to live in poverty and rely on public assistance, posing a major challenge in recruitment, a new report suggests.

Who wants to be called a worker?

Who wants to be called a worker?

I have always welcomed change, as I truly believe that growth and progress require it. So, why do I have such a hard time embracing an occupational title change for certified nursing assistants? I guess it's because of the suggested titles and terminology.

Direct-care workers to be focus of summit examining best practices, research and policy

It's said approximately 90% of direct long-term care is performed by aides, and it is that category of worker that will be highlighted at a daylong summit Thursday in the nation's capital. The invitation-only event will feature a keynote address by Gerri Fiala, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Employment & Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. Stakeholders involved in eldercare, research and policy will conduct panel sessions focusing on current and future conditions.