Dietary change may help wound healing

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Proline and arginine supplementation can help heal wounds in diabetic patients, according to a study published in the American Journal of Physiology – Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, published by the American Physiological Society.

Diabetic ulcers are a common problem among diabetic patients. It is estimated that approximately 80% of such patients undergo lower leg amputation.

French researchers found that diabetic rats on a high protein diet with arginine and proline — specific molecules found in protein — showed better wound healing over rats fed either standard or high protein food without arginine and proline supplementation.

Researchers divided 18 rats into three groups that were either fed a standard diet, a high-protein diet or a high-protein diet supplemented with arginine and proline. On the first day of the experiment, each rat was given an incision, under which a sponge was placed in order to collect wound-healing fluid. To assess skin regrowth and healing, researchers also removed two full-thickness sections of skin from the rats' backs each day from day 1 until day 5, when the experiment ended. 


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