Demand soars for assisted living, news report finds

Share this article:

Consumers are clambering to get into assisted living facilities, a news report finds.

Wait lists are becoming increasingly common, and that has driven up the price, according to the Wall Street Journal. Occupancy at the 36,000 facilities is about 95%, and the average annual cost for such facilities – without healthcare expenses – reached about $35,000 in 2005, a 33% increase from 2002, a recent survey by MetLife found.

Shopping for an assisted living facility is tough because of differences in state regulations regarding Medicaid coverage, and differences in options packages, the Journal said.
Share this article:

More in News

MedPAC discusses limiting patients' post-acute options

MedPAC discusses limiting patients' post-acute options

Medicare rules might have to be relaxed to give hospitals more say in where patients go for post-acute care, members of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission proposed at a recent ...

Nursing home workers told not to touch residents due to Ebola concerns

U.S. nursing home workers who hail from West Africa are being stigmatized as potential Ebola carriers and forbidden from touching residents, according to IRIN, an independent news service launched by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

Former office manager charged with embezzling half a million dollars from residents

The former business office manager of a Michigan nursing home has been charged with embezzling more than $460,000 from the resident trust fund, the state's attorney general announced last Thursday.