Critics rip findings in latest citation report

Share this article:
Association disputes findings in recent survey on CNAs in long-term care
Association disputes findings in recent survey on CNAs in long-term care
State officials and provider groups are up in arms over a recent federal report on nursing home survey violations. They argue that the aggregate deficiency totals present a biased perspective that does not accurately reflect care delivery in the nation's 16,000 nursing homes.

The Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Inspector General report paints a worse picture than actually exists, several state and industry officials insisted. A Georgia state health official, for example, said that most infractions were for minor offenses, such as housekeeping and maintenance issues, or food issues. Idaho health officials were similarly concerned.

Virginia Burke, president of the Rhode Island Health Care Association told McKnight's that the survey process is riddled with inconsistencies. Standard interpretations routinely vary by inspector and across states, she said.

“You have to look at a number of quality measures before you can make a broad statement about the quality of care in one state versus another,” Burke added.

About 94% of the for-profit homes surveyed generated a citation, compared to 91% for government nursing homes and 88% for nonprofits.
Share this article:

More in News

White House creates new national strategy on antibiotics

White House creates new national strategy on antibiotics

The Obama administration has unveiled a national strategy to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. It includes an executive order to direct the federal government to "reduce the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant ...

Medicaid provider agreement remains legitimate during bankruptcy proceedings, judge rules

Medicaid must continue to make payments to a Florida nursing home undergoing bankruptcy proceedings, a federal judge rule recently.

Legislator pushes for more HCBS services for Medicaid beneficiaries

Medicaid beneficiaries would have an opportunity to receive more care in a home or community-based setting if a House of Representatives bill passes.