Credit crisis affected seniors housing in 2008 fourth quarter, NIC reports

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States using Medicaid stimulus funding to fill budget gaps, report finds
States using Medicaid stimulus funding to fill budget gaps, report finds
Transaction volumes fell and capitalization rates rose in seniors housing and care in the fourth quarter of last year, according to a new report from the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industry. They are signs of the credit crisis, the organization said.  

Roughly $1 billion in loan volume was pumped into the seniors housing and care industry during the fourth quarter last year. That compares with average quarterly loan volume of $1.54 billion over the last three years, the NIC report found. Still, loan performance dropped just 40 basis points compared to the same quarter in 2007. It generally held steady from the third quarter of 2008. NIC officials, however, did note the first seniors housing foreclosure in five years, which occurred in the assisted living sector.

Meanwhile, capitalization rates continued their upward climb in the skilled nursing sector, growing from 12.75% in the third quarter to 13.1% in the fourth quarter. Rates in the assisted living sector grew only slightly during the same time, ticking up from 9.2% to 9.3%, according to NIC.
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