Court says employer not burdened by contraception mandate

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Nursing home operators lose 93% of appeals: report
Nursing home operators lose 93% of appeals: report
A federal trial court has declined to grant an injunction in a case over the Affordable Care Act's “contraceptive mandate,” finding against companies that said the requirement goes against their religious beliefs.

 

Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. and Mardel Inc., both of which are owned by the Green family, told the court that the requirement to cover contraception, sterilization and emergency contraceptives within their employee health insurance plan violated their rights under the First Amendment and the Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

 

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit did not concur, agreeing with the lower court that the “contraception mandate” doesn't pose a substantial burden to the rights of the corporations. It declined to give a preliminary injunction.

 

Employers have been keeping an eye on the host of lawsuits such as this filed over the mandate, including one by a group of Catholic institutions. The mandate has an exception for explicitly religious institutions, but does not apply to universities or non-profits.

 

Hobby Lobby has said it will appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

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