COPD tied to poor sleep, low blood oxygen levels, research finds

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Low arterial blood oxygen levels are tied to poor sleep quality in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, new research finds.

In a study that compared people with COPD and people without the respiratory disease, investigators found that people with COPD reported fatigue, sleepiness and impaired quality of life more frequently than those without the disease.

The researchers, from St. Vincent's University Hospital in Dublin, also found that people with COPD have a harder time getting to sleep and have more interrupted sleep than people without COPD. Problems with sleep efficiency are likely tied to daytime hypoxemia, or low arterial blood oxygen levels, investigators said.

"However, sleep quality in COPD is determined by several factors and further studies on this topic are necessary to fully evaluate the relationship. This may identify therapeutic interventions that might improve the overall quality of life in COPD patients," lead researcher Walter McNicholas, M.D., wrote.

The findings were published in a recent issue of the journal Respirology .

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