Common pay system for three post-acute care settings appears doable, new report says

Share this article:
Relief could be on the horizon for providers, regulators and other stakeholders who have struggled to find common evaluation and payment models for individuals who move between post-acute care settings, researchers say.

Study results indicate a common pay system for skilled nursing facilities, long-term care hospitals and inpatient rehabilitation facilities could be built, they add. They base their conclusions upon findings of the Post Acute Care Payment Reform Demonstration, which involved 140 general acute and post-acute care providers. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services project employed a new assessment instrument, the CARE Tool (Continuity Assessments Record and Evaluation).

“The implementation of CARE within the demonstration was successful,” said a recently released CMS report on it. “All five settings were able to use CARE to collect information in a consistent, reliable, and comprehensive manner for their Medicare populations.”

Researchers said that the “promise of the CARE tool,” combined with the importance of standardizing information collected between settings, means CMS “should pursue its development efforts towards integrating CARE into the reporting requirements” for SNFs, acute care hospitals, home health agencies, inpatient rehabilitation facilities and long-term care hospitals.

The development of case-mix systems using uniform definitions and measures of patient acuity between different settings “can be accomplished with a limited set of common patient acuity items. [Post-acute care] payment systems can be improved by the inclusion of patient acuity measures that are not included in current payment systems,” they observed.

Click here to read the full CMS report.

Share this article:

More in News

Congressman requests briefing on nursing home five-star rating system

Congressman requests briefing on nursing home five-star rating ...

A leader in Congress has called for an evaluation of the nursing home five-star rating system in light of a recent New York Times article. Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) requested ...

CMS: Discharge assessments must be completed when residents transfer to a non-certified ...

Skilled nursing facilities must complete a discharge assessment when a resident is transferred from a certified to a non-certified bed, even if both beds are in the same building, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services emphasizes in a recent memorandum.

Focusing on a single word might improve nursing home residents' quality of ...

An affordable, easily implemented relaxation technique could improve nursing home residents' psychological well-being. It also could potentially boost their immune systems, according to recently published findings.