Cognitive tests don't differentiate between Alzheimer's, vascular dementia, study finds

Share this article:
Less than 2% of the most common neuropsychological tests can differentiate between Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, according to a recently published report.

Researchers at the University of Adelaide compared the accuracy of 118 diagnostic tests to determine which, if any, were best at characterizing Alzheimer's disease from vascular dementia. The tests were performed in 81 previous studies involving more than 7,000 seniors with dementia. Only two—Delayed Story Recall and the Emotional Recognition Task—showed any ability to distinguish between either group.

Though cognitive tests can certainly help diagnose dementia, accurately identifying a patient's specific type of dementia is key to effectively treating that condition, report authors say. Doctors should combine such tests with brain scans, medical histories and other tools, researchers suggest. The report appears in the July issue of the journal Neuropsychology.
Share this article:

More in News

Rape investigation blocked by nursing home's HIPAA concerns, authorities say ...

Florida authorities say a nursing home is citing privacy laws to impede the investigation of a possible resident rape, according to local news reports.

Jury hands down $14 million negligent care verdict to 'send message' to nursing homes

Jury hands down $14 million negligent care verdict ...

A Massachusetts jury has awarded $14 million to the family of a nursing home resident who died due to a pressure ulcer, dehydration and other conditions linked to negligent care, ...

CCRC executive director salaries hold steady, therapy directors get boost

Continuing care retirement community executive director salaries have barely increased in the past year, while therapy and rehabilitation directors received a boost, a new report shows. The average salary for a therapy and rehab director is currently $95,905.