Cognition

Preserving Cognitive Status in Elderly Surgical Patients Requiring General Anesthesia

Preserving Cognitive Status in Elderly Surgical Patients Requiring General Anesthesia

The elderly brain is more vulnerable to the adverse effects of surgery and anesthesia compared with the younger brain. Both anecdotally and in clinical investigation, the elderly surgical population has been found to exhibit a significantly higher prevalence of postoperative cognitive decline. The most common manifestations of this decline are postoperative delirium (POD) and postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD).

Senior centers should lower the music, research advises

By

The positive benefits of music for the frail elderly abound in medical literature, but new research suggests music that is too loud may be more harmful than helpful.

'Superagers' have different brains

By

Often referred to as the "cognitive elite," or "superagers," sharp-thinking seniors close to either side of 100 have brains that could yield changes in memory care and treatment for diseases like dementia and Alzheimer's, according to new research.

Better heart health tied to memory recall in older adults

Seniors who have better heart and lung health tend to have better memory recall and cognitive capabilities, according to a new study in the Journal of Gerontology.

Also in the news for August 19, 2014 . . .

AHCA announces Gold National Quality Award recipients ... Older adults' cognition peaks in the morning ... DNA alteration linked to Alzheimer's

Early intellectual stimulation may result in better cognition in older adults

By

Life experiences with intellectual stimulation may have more impact than demographic influences on cognitive abilities in older adults, researchers find.

Cognitive training can help in ADLs, study finds

Older adults who participate in mental exercise programs reported less difficulty with activities of daily living, according to a new study. Researchers reported that benefits were still apparent as long as 10 years after training took place.

Long-term statin use reduces dementia risk by 30%, researchers discover

By

Statins, which are commonly used to treat high cholesterol, do not cause cognition problems in the short term and may offer significant protection against dementia in the long term. This is according to new research that contradicts government warnings about these medications.

Building better brains — and better bottom lines

Building better brains — and better bottom lines

Wellness directors confronted with a decision whether to adopt computerized brain fitness programs designed to combat cognitive decline are faced with two critical questions. First, do these programs work? And second, will they add to the bottom line?

Intensity of activities doesn't determine level of benefits for seniors, researchers say

By

Mental and physical stimulation improves seniors' memory and thinking skill, regardless of how rigorous the activities are, according to a recently published study.

Therapy helps mend aphasia

By

Aggressive therapy can improve language function and general cognition for seniors who have had aphasia for years, according to a study recently published in Brain and Language.

Operate with an eye on quality, not the next survey cycle

Operate with an eye on quality, not the next survey cycle

By

The anxiety associated with an impending survey should be offset by the fact that the nursing facility holds the secret to its own success - the knowledge of its customers.

Dementia researchers find non-drug intervention 'at least' as effective as medications in halting disease progression

A non-drug dementia intervention piloted in German nursing homes proved as effective as medications in halting progression of disease, a new study reveals.

Deep brain stimulation holds promising results for Alzheimer's, study shows

Electrical stimulation appears to reverse some of the brain damage caused by Alzheimer's disease in people with early symptoms of the degenerative disorder, new research suggests.

Memory fitness programs boost verbal memory, perception of memory, study finds

Memory fitness programs at senior living communities helped improve seniors' verbal learning and retention, plus boosted their self-perceived memory, a new study finds.

Don't miss any McKnight's news