CMS to release more than $2 billion in grants for community-based long-term care services program

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Automatic 2% Medicare cuts begin
Automatic 2% Medicare cuts begin

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services on Monday disclosed it will provide $2.25 billion in grants to expand the Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing demonstration. This program seeks to find community-based alternatives to traditional long-term care facilities.

CMS is encouraging states not already participating in the MFP program to apply for funds, the agency said. Under the MFP demonstration, states will receive an enhanced federal medical assistance percentage (FMAP) for a one-year period for each individual they transition from an institution to a qualified home and community-based program.  States will be able to transition multiple population groups including the elderly, people with intellectual, developmental or physical disabilities, mental illness or those who have a dual diagnosis, according to a CMS statement.

CMS will host a call on Aug. 11 to discuss the MFP application process, and also will host a series of technical seminars on the grants process beginning in September. More information is available at http://www.cms.gov/CommunityServices/20_MFP.asp.

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