CMS expands reporting requirements for hospice providers serving skilled nursing facilities

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Hospice workers who provide care for residents of skilled nursing facilities will have to provide more detailed claim data starting next year, according to recently released requirements from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

Nurses, aides, social workers, physical and occupational therapists, and speech-language pathologists are all expected to report line-item visit data for general inpatient care they provide to Medicare hospice patients in SNFs or hospitals, CMS announced. This data will be used by CMS in efforts to revise hospice care payments, per the Affordable Care Act.

A Medicare Learning Network document emailed Wednesday summarizes coding for the new claims reporting. There are codes for general inpatient care, post-mortem visits, injectable drugs, non-injectable prescriptions and infusion pumps.

Hospice providers can begin submitting this information with claims starting Jan. 1, 2014, and the reporting will be mandatory as of April 1, 2014.

Click here to access the complete CMS transmittal.

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