CMS expands reporting requirements for hospice providers serving skilled nursing facilities

Share this article:

Hospice workers who provide care for residents of skilled nursing facilities will have to provide more detailed claim data starting next year, according to recently released requirements from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

Nurses, aides, social workers, physical and occupational therapists, and speech-language pathologists are all expected to report line-item visit data for general inpatient care they provide to Medicare hospice patients in SNFs or hospitals, CMS announced. This data will be used by CMS in efforts to revise hospice care payments, per the Affordable Care Act.

A Medicare Learning Network document emailed Wednesday summarizes coding for the new claims reporting. There are codes for general inpatient care, post-mortem visits, injectable drugs, non-injectable prescriptions and infusion pumps.

Hospice providers can begin submitting this information with claims starting Jan. 1, 2014, and the reporting will be mandatory as of April 1, 2014.

Click here to access the complete CMS transmittal.

Share this article:
close

Next Article in News

More in News

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate arrested

Double homicide at Houston nursing home; victims' roommate ...

A double murder occurred late Tuesday night in a Houston nursing home room shared by four men, according to local authorities. Police arrested Guillermo Correa on suspicion of beating two ...

$2 million HIPAA settlement highlights mobile device risks facing healthcare providers

Laptops and other mobile devices containing personal health information have been stolen from long-term care ombudsman programs and other healthcare organizations, including from Concentra Health Services and QCA Health Plan Inc. Now, Concentra and QCA have agreed to legal settlements totaling nearly $2 million, federal ...

Long-term care nurses often 'scramble' to get family members' blessing for palliative ...

Nursing home residents might not transition to full palliative care until they are very near death, at which point nurses and family members act in a state of crisis, suggests recently published research out of Canada.