CMS: Eldercare research should focus on cardiovascular disease, neurology

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DAY ONE: McKnight's third annual Online Expo to kick off with webcasts on technology, wound care and
DAY ONE: McKnight's third annual Online Expo to kick off with webcasts on technology, wound care and
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recently identified cardiovascular disease and neurology as top research priorities for the field of eldercare.

The suggestions appeared in CMS' first "Evidentiary Priorities for the Elderly Population," according to the Bureau of National Affairs news service. CMS also lists cancer, infectious disease, electronic health records, and prevention as major areas of interest for the eldercare field.

Besides identifying important areas of research, the agency discussed diagnostics and screening, policy issues, and "interventions," or suggested areas of study. In each section of the EPEP, CMS proposes a research topic, and asks a question regarding that topic. Under the diagnostics section, for example, CMS asks researchers to discover whether or not screening the elderly for atherosclerosis is beneficial and cost-effective.

To learn more about CMS' suggestions, visit http://www.cms.hhs.gov/CoverageGenInfo/07_EvidentiaryPriorities.asp#TopOfPage.
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