CMS attempts to improve coordination between hospice, long-term care providers

Share this article:
Nursing homes better for handling dementia patients, study suggests
Nursing homes better for handling dementia patients, study suggests

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has proposed a change in guidelines as to how skilled nursing facilities qualify for Medicare and how nursing facilities qualify for Medicaid. Such a rule would make it easier for long-term care facilities to arrange hospice care provisions with one or more Medicare-certified hospice providers, CMS said.

The rule would help long-term care facilities working with hospice facilities have definitive guidelines detailing the roles and responsibilities each organization must execute. Current regulations allow a long-term care facility to choose to have a written agreement with one or more hospice providers for a Medicare-eligible resident who chooses to have hospice. But if the facility chooses not to contract with a Medicare-certified hospice to provide hospice services for the resident who wants it, the facility is responsible for assisting the resident in transferring to a facility that will arrange for the provision of such services. (Download the attachment to see the proposed role.)

“We believe there is a lack of clear regulatory direction regarding the responsibilities of providers in caring for LTC facility residents who receive hospice care from a Medicare certified hospice provider, which could result in duplicative or missing services,” CMS said in the proposed rule.

Share this article:

More in News

OIG: Nursing homes correctly reported 53% of abuse or neglect allegations in 2012

OIG: Nursing homes correctly reported 53% of abuse ...

Only about half of nursing facilities correctly reported abuse or neglect allegations in 2012, indicating that the government needs to provide more guidance and oversight, according to a new report ...

Aggressive blood pressure treatment does not increase fall risk after all, study ...

Taking aggressive measures to lower older adults' blood pressure may not increase their risk of falls, contrary to conventional wisdom, according to recently published research findings.

Hackers steal HIPAA-protected info of 4.5 million people from hospital network

Long-term care and other provider types already have been on the alert for large-scale computer breaches, and their concerns likely will be stoked by news that one of the nation's largest hospital organizations has been hacked. The personal information of about 4.5 million patients was ...