CDC: Increased numbers of adults have problems with ADLs

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More adults are struggling with basic activities of daily living (ADLs), according to research from the Centers from Disease Control & Prevention.

Investigators examined 2011 National Health Interview Survey results to reach their findings. While the data excludes those already in nursing homes, it found that the average percentage of adults who had at least one ADL limit increased 0.2 percentage points to 2.2% in 2011. Every age group had a higher percentage of people reporting ADL limits.

ADL coding is a major issue for long-term care, driving care planning and reimbursement rates for providers.

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