Cataract surgery improves mood, cognition, sleep in Alzheimer's patients, research shows

Share this article:

People with mild forms of Alzheimer's disease experienced improvement in sleep patterns, cognitive functioning and mood after undergoing vision-correcting cataract surgery, new research revealed.

The study, conducted by researchers at Tenon Hospital in Paris, is the first to examine if cataract surgery benefits people with Alzheimer's.

Investigators studied 38 patients with mild Alzheimer's and debilitating cataract in at least one eye before and after participants underwent cataract surgery. They found that 25% of these patients exhibited improvement in cognitive status, the ability to perceive, understand and respond appropriately to one's surroundings. Several of the patients became less depressed.

"In future studies we intend to learn what factors, specifically, led to the positive effects we found, so that we can boost the quality of life for Alzheimer's patients, their families and caregivers," said lead researcher Brigitte Girard, M.D., in findings presented Tuesday at the American Academy of Ophthalmology's 2011 Annual Meeting.

Share this article:

More in News

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in two years: Avalere

Bulk of Medicaid to be managed care in ...

More than three-quarters of Medicaid beneficiaries will be enrolled in a managed care plan as of 2016, according to an Avalere Health analysis released Thursday. The numbers reveal that managed ...

Nursing home asked for employee's personal information too often, jury rules

The human resources department of a Maine nursing home did not properly protect a former employee's personal identification information, a jury recently ruled.

Test could confirm sepsis within an hour

Nursing home residents might benefit from a new way of diagnosing and treating sepsis made possible by discoveries out of the University of British Columbia.