Caregiving

When Father's Day arrives in December

When Father's Day arrives in December

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I have enjoyed a life largely free of the misfortune that time and circumstance can bring. All things considered, it's been a pretty good ride so far. But even the most fortunate among us does not get off scot-free

Alzheimer's caregiving: The new normal

Alzheimer's caregiving: The new normal

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I dealt first with my wife's Alzheimer's as a 24/7 caregiver at home, and now as a part-time caregiver and full-time advocate since her placement in the dementia wing of an assisted living facility in September. One of the many things I have learned through these years is that each new AD decline in behavior and/or skills always leads to a "new normal" period for us.

I was a better nurse when ...

I was a better nurse when ...

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It's Nurses Day — a day we celebrate all it means to be a nurse. This day gets me into deep thinking. Particularly about the core of a nurse and how sometimes — even if we don't want it to be — the environment we work in changes us. Let me try and explain.

Gender adjustments for Alzheimer's caregivers

Gender adjustments for Alzheimer's caregivers

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For quite some time, I was the only male in my Alzheimer's disease spousal support group. I quickly discovered that I could not resolve some problems for my wife, Clare, in the same way as some women were resolving similar issues for their husbands.

The impact on overtime pay in home care

The impact on overtime pay in home care

The final ruling on the Federal Companionship Exemption took place recently as a result of a new proposal by the Obama administration. On the surface, the issue appears to be the eligibility of in-home caregivers to receive fair wages and overtime pay. Up until now, daily live-in senior care has been exempt from overtime pay under the companionship exemption within the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

More evidence that long-term care operators are not simply heartless bottom feeders

More evidence that long-term care operators are not simply heartless bottom feeders

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What matters most to long-term care operators? Certainly, remaining in business is a top priority. But providers are not just fixated on the bottom line. Here are some telltale signs.

Is 2013 the year of action?

Is 2013 the year of action?

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We've been in cycles of awareness-building, instead of action-driving, for far too long. Awareness is good, of course, and we've learned many important things over the past several years.

A savvy caregiver's resource

A savvy caregiver's resource

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If there is anyone who knows how to get inside the head of a troubled long-term care resident, it is Eleanor Feldman Barbera. Better than that is the fact that this talented nursing home psychologist is willing to share what she knows.

Caregiving in the ER - Part 1

Caregiving in the ER - Part 1

America's emergency rooms are full of families going through crisis situations. When an accident or illness requires a visit to the ER, many families are likely to enter the scene overwhelmed and unsure of what to do next for their loved one.

Baby boomers overwhelmed by caring for their parents, survey finds

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Senior living operators should find more ways to market and discuss long-term care financing with baby boomers, a new survey suggests.

Coming out of the closet with caregiving

Coming out of the closet with caregiving

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Who ever thought that caregivers would need to come out of the closet and be accepted? It's true.

A time for pride to take over for nursing homes

A time for pride to take over for nursing homes

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If you're a long-term care provider reading this in the waning hours before fiscal 2012 hits, be strong. If you're reading this after Saturday, Oct. 1, stand tall.

Census data reveal a new, masculine trend in eldercare

Census data reveal a new, masculine trend in eldercare

It is a well-known fact that our nation is aging rapidly. However, a recently released census brief, "Age and Sex Composition: 2010," revealed remarkable findings. The study found that in the last decade, the male population grew much faster than the female population in the 60-plus age group. Understanding this demographic shift and responding to it appropriately will bring new opportunities to long-term care companies.

Economic impact of family caregivers is substantial, report suggests

Well over 40 million Americans provided care for an adult family member in 2009, representing an unpaid economic impact of approximately $450 billion, according to a new report from the AARP Public Policy Institute.

Racial preference ruling disseminated to state's nursing homes

All nursing homes in Indiana will be notified of a recent court ruling that declared that nursing home residents cannot specify treatment from a particular caregiver based on race, state health officials said recently.

If Ivy Bean can master Twitter, so can we

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Did anyone else get a kick out of last week's story about Ivy Bean, the Twitter user who died at the age of 104?

Australian nursing homes unveil electronic underpants

Nursing homes in New South Wales, Australia, soon will have a new caregiving tool at their disposal for resident incontinence: electronic underpants.

Common steroid treatment could harm patients with pneumonia, research shows

Prednisolone, a steroid commonly co-prescribed as a treatment for pneumonia, has little benefit and may actually worsen patient outcomes, researchers say.

One-third of American adults provide care, new report finds

One-third of American adults provide care, new report finds

There are more informal caregivers in the U.S. than ever before. Nearly one-third of the population provides some level of care, according to a new study.

Report: 10% jump in Alzheimer's in five years

Rapidly accelerating rates of dementia worldwide will result in a 10% increase in the number of dementia sufferers in the 2005 to 2010 time frame, according to a new report from Alzheimer's Disease International. The acceleration of cases will lead to an Alzheimer's that will double every 20 years, resulting in an estimated 115 million dementia patients by mid-century, researchers said.

Rising number of childless elderly poses future long-term care challenges, new report suggests

The growing number of childless seniors in developed countries may cause caregiving problems in the future. That is according to a new report from the U.S. Census bureau, "An Aging World: 2008."

Promising discovery could help prevent age-related macular degeneration

Researchers at the University of Kentucky have announced a major breakthrough in the prevention and early detection of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The condition affects between 10 million and 12 million Americans and is the number-one cause of blindness among seniors.

Number of nursing home beds, residents decreasing, report finds

Number of nursing home beds, residents decreasing, report finds

The number of both nursing home beds and nursing home residents in the United States declined between 1999 and 2004, according to the recently released results of the National Nursing Home Survey: 2004 Overview.

First reports of swine flu at nursing homes surface, professionals council issues guidelines

A council of long-term care professionals has issued guidelines for dealing with suspected or actual outbreaks of H1N1, or swine flu. The recommendations came out late last week, just hours before the first suspected cases of the flu at nursing facilities began to surface.

Study: Hispanics receive poorer nursing home care

Nursing facilities with a primarily Hispanic resident population generally provide lower quality care than facilities primarily servicing whites, say Brown University researchers who focused on pressure ulcer care.

Robot nurses to care for aging Japanese

Japan, like many countries around the world, is facing a serious shortage of caregivers to look after its rapidly growing elderly population. Unlike others, however, it is about to create an army of robot nurses.

Researcher says injections may be answer to incontinence problems

Women who suffer from stress urinary incontinence can be helped by collagen injections, even after surgery has failed, a medical researcher says. A majority of nursing home residents suffer from one or more types of incontinence.

Regulators see need to issue new guide for dining assistants in nursing homes

Regulators see need to issue new guide for dining assistants in nursing homes

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has completed a guide for providers who want to employ dining assistants in their facilities. After a drawn out battle, CMS agreed five years ago to allow the use of paid feeding assistants--provided they achieve a certain level of training and have the approval of the state.

Study shows nursing homes beginning to lose funding dominance to HCBS

Study shows nursing homes beginning to lose funding dominance to HCBS

A handful of states are now spending more of their Medicaid funding on home- and community-based services than on nursing home care, according to a new report from AARP. The study also found that nursing home occupancy rates have remained static over the last five years, while HCBS funding has soared.

Think happy thoughts: views on aging tied to poor health later in life

Younger people who believe negative stereotypes about aging are more prone to suffer poor health when they themselves reach old age, new research suggests.

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