Caregivers

Ask the nursing expert ... about juggling responsibilities

Ask the nursing expert ... about juggling responsibilities

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How can a director of nursing juggle all the day-to-day responsibilities and still be available to the needs of his or her staff?

When assessing nursing home resident preferences, remember that 'it depends,' researchers say

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Nursing home residents' preferences depend on a variety of shifting factors, so caregivers should frequently assess preferences and seek to understand what is behind them, according to recently published research.

Focus on nursing: Building relationships with the MS patient

Focus on nursing: Building relationships with the MS patient

Because of its chronic nature, MS patients sometimes need access to healthcare professionals beyond regular appointments. Those with mobility and disability issues may also find it challenging to get to their physician's office. MS One to One provides support to registered program members living with MS and their care partners.

Four ways for assisted living operators to facilitate transitions

Four ways for assisted living operators to facilitate transitions

My wife, Clare, has Alzheimer's disease and recently entered the "Reflections" unit for residents with dementia in an assisted living facility. Clare's transition from home to ALF was about as good as I could have hoped for. However, there are four steps that our ALF could have taken to make this transition much easier for both of us.

Young people becoming more realistic about future long-term care needs, survey finds

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Younger people are more informed about long-term care financing and are more likely to be saving for their future needs than older Americans, according to a recent national survey.

Family communication found  important for memory care

Family communication found important for memory care

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Taking the time to learn a dementia resident's life story is an essential tool in managing behavior in a memory care unit, an expert said in July.

Adult day services benefit mood, stress of caregivers, expert says

Adult day services benefit mood, stress of caregivers, expert says

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Adult day services can literally be a lifesaver to family caregivers living with seniors with dementia, according to new research.

Invisible heroes seen

Invisible heroes seen

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I've written a lot about ageism. About how people don't value the contributions of seniors. About how long-term care residents are invisible and forgotten. About kids these days, and why they don't respect their elders. As raving tangents go, I'm generally not bullish on the prospects for societal culture change. But after recently traveling to Washington, D.C., with 10 World War II veterans and their 14 caregivers, I might have to reconsider.

5 lessons long-term care providers can learn from Joan Lunden

5 lessons long-term care providers can learn from Joan Lunden

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Award-winning journalist and author Joan Lunden has learned a lot from dealing with her 94-year-old mother's housing and care. Also a physician's daughter, she recently passed along to me some excellent tips for long-term care professionals, which I now pass along to you.

Something to hand everyone who admits a loved one to your nursing home

Something to hand everyone who admits a loved one to your nursing home

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Raise your hand if you've ever had a family that just didn't "get it" when dealing with the staff at your nursing home or long-term care facility. OK, everybody put their hand down now. It's time to learn why Marie Marley could be your next best friend.

Achieving person-centric care in LTC

Achieving person-centric care in LTC

How can long-term care providers make real improvements in the care delivered to those in need? It's important for providers to put participants and their families front and center, rather than focusing on care settings, providers and programs. That way, providers will have a full picture - not a siloed outlook - of each participant.

Ahhhhhhhh, there's the rub

Ahhhhhhhh, there's the rub

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In all the tumult over the Time magazine expose of pervasive and obscene healthcare billing excesses, you might have missed the almost as exciting discovery that foot massages at work lower blood pressure and anxiety for dementia caregivers. At least one snippy McKnight's reader irately claims this isn't "real news." He or she definitely needs a lengthy foot rub, and possibly half a Xanax dissolved in a cup of chamomile tea.

Dementia caregivers who receive foot massages at work enjoy lower blood pressure, less anxiety, researchers say

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Caregivers working with seniors who have dementia benefit from foot massages administered during their shifts, suggests new research.

'Old' categorization based on activities, not age

New research shows that caregivers for non-institutionalized elderly consumers view them as "old" when they can't perform everyday consumption tasks on their own — not because of their age.

On the other side of long-term care

On the other side of long-term care

Here I am in my 40th year of long-term care. It is often said that you cannot teach an old dog new tricks, but that is not totally true. You can teach an old dog new tricks; it's just extremely difficult. In the case of this old dog, it took a near-death experience.

Seniors are accepting of robotic assistance, survey shows

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Seniors are generally receptive to the idea of caregiving robots, though they prefer assistance from humans for certain tasks, a new survey finds.

Give unto others

Give unto others

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Looking for a cure for compassion fatigue? Try reminding your caregivers of the obvious — that their job is all about giving. Trust me, there is some science to this.

Home-based dementia intervention prevents or delays nursing home admission, research suggests

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Dementia patients who were able to receive in-home treatment delayed nursing home admission, new research says.

Direct caregivers will make up nation's largest workforce by 2020, analysis predicts

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Direct care workers, a group that includes nursing assistants, home health aides and personal care aides, are expected to comprise the United States' largest workforce by 2020, according to a new analysis.

Caregivers for Medicaid recipients often live in poverty, study finds

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Caregivers for low-income seniors and the disabled often live in poverty or near-poverty themselves, according to a new study.

Baby boomers overwhelmed by caring for their parents, survey finds

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Senior living operators should find more ways to market and discuss long-term care financing with baby boomers, a new survey suggests.

Subsidizing caregiver wages could help contain long-term care costs, research shows

Subsidizing caregiver wages could help contain long-term care costs, research shows

Government subsidies might help more low-wage workers remain in nursing homes, according to a researcher at the University of Illinois.

Adult caregivers face growing financial and emotional costs

Almost 10 million adults over the age of 50 are becoming caregivers for their own parents, resulting in a loss of $3 trillion in wages, pension and Social Security benefits for time taken off from work, according to a new study.

State caregiver matching programs complement CLASS Act, study finds

Caregiver matching programs, which help elderly and disabled individuals manage their own home healthcare, are a good fit with various provisions of the Community Living Assistance Services and Supports (CLASS) Act, according to a new study.

Study: Onset of Alzheimer's preceded by years of rapidly accelerating mental decline

People who develop Alzheimer's disease typically experience up to six years of accelerated mental decline before the disease presents itself, according to new research.

Nearly 60% of paid home caregivers make medication errors, study finds

Nearly 60% of paid home caregivers make medication errors, study finds

One-third of paid caregivers who work for clients who live in their own homes had difficulty reading and understanding health-related information and instructions. Furthermore, 60% of them made medication errors involving their clients, according to Northwestern University researchers, who say the study is the first of its kind.

Government releases funding to help older adults navigate long-term care

Government releases funding to help older adults navigate long-term care

Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on Monday said $68 million in grant money is available to help seniors, the disabled and their caregivers better understand options for long-term care.

Robot caregivers for elderly could debut in three years

Robot helpers for the elderly could be available in as little as three years, recent reports from the University of Illinois at Chicago suggest.

Grumpy old men? Hardly, researchers say

"If you should survive to 105, look at all you'll derive out of being alive," goes the Frank Sinatra tune. Now, research is backing up that sentiment, as scientists report that people who live longer tend to have a more optimistic view toward life.

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